INTERMEDIATE THEATRE / BEG. TECHNICAL THEATRE

Brief Course Description: Acting students will broaden and deepen acting skills, including styles, directing, Theatre history, and Children’s Theatre. Students will have the opportunity to audition for the advanced ensemble.

Technical theatre students will learn the fundamentals of play production including set design and construction, lighting, sound, and costuming. Students will have the opportunity to progress to Technical Theatre II and III.

Interested in ‘leadership’ within HSTC? Click here to learn more!


COURSE DOCUMENTS

Intermediate Fall Semester Calendar (Daily Instructional Goals, Homework, & Assessments)

HSHS Wifi Instructions

Self/Peer Collaboration Rubric

Class Leadership Application

Character Analysis Worksheet

Essay Rubric (Honors)

Script Analysis Template

“Why Arts” Video

HSHS Scene Shop Rules & Expectations

NC Theatre Arts Essential Standards rev. 9.5.18

‘Performance Reflection’ Rubric
Unsatisfactory Range: 60-60%
Proficient Range: 71-84%
Advanced Range: 85-100%


REQUIRED FORMS

STEP 1: Review the Class Handbook & Syllabus

STEP 2 Due Friday, 9/7: Complete the Handbook Review Form

STEP 3: Print, have your parent/guardian sign, and turn in the following forms (ALL Due Friday, 9/7):

WCPSS Photo & Video Release Form

2018-19 Boosters Membership Form

STEP 4: Join the class’s GroupMe – see the link below


CONTACT INFORMATION & COMMUNICATION

Instructor / Director: Mr. Rome Buttner
B.A. in English, B.A. in Theatre Arts

Email: mbuttner@wcpss.net

GroupMe: https://groupme.com/join_group/43574399/sUYlAP

Twitter: @hshstheatre


STUDENT LEADERS: 

Stage Managers: Dominick Cruze, Rou Pey Ling, & Taiylor Wade

Costumes Leader: Shanee Yamnitsky

Props and Laptop Leader: Whitney Hymas & Zoey Moore

Communications Managers: Sarah Lindley & Morgan Yorton

Attendance Managers: Kyleigh Dumas, Sharon George, & Logan Haynes

Drill Manager: Natalia Fagundez


DAILY CLASS BLOG:

12.7.18

Tech Production Week #1 Reflection

  1. What is your assigned role and its description?
  2. How have you (and your team if applicable) prepared and organized this week?
  3. Referring to the pre-show checklist that each crew must create, what are 3 examples of items on the list?
  4. Going into Production Week #2 (next week), what action items (things you need to get done) are on your list?

HOMEWORK FOR MONDAY, DEC 10: Prepare your production notebook and complete the Week 1 reflection. Mr. Buttner will ask to see both on Monday.

12.5.18

Tech Production Meeting Notes:

What’s required starting 12.6:

3-Ring Binder Production Notebook
Divider Tabs
#1: Scripts
#2: Directing Notes/Information
#3: Tech Notes
#4: 3 Reflections

Tech students worked together on reading the plays and documenting notes for each group. That document was shared on the class’s groupme.

11.30.18

Self Reflection/Assessment

Using complete sentences, respond to each of the following questions:

1. How do you feel about your performance? How clear was the storytelling?

2. Describe your preparation and how that affected your overall performance. Were you fully prepared? If not, how so?

3. What you feel you did well and what you wished had gone differently.

4. Explain what you learned about yourself as a performer?

5. What you would do differently if you had the opportunity to perform again?

6. Regarding your character, what did your character want?? What was your tactic to achieve your goal?

7. How could you make that choice (your tactic in achieving your objective) clearer / larger / simpler / bolder?

8. What is the length of your performance video?

11.29.18

Actors: Reviewed You Can’t Beat the House performace and recieved cast list for SDPF

Techs: Recieved tech positions for SDPF

11.28.18

Actors: Finished monologue performances

11.27.18

Actors: Continued performances of monologues

11.26.18

Actors: Began performances of monologues and received short play assignments

Techs: Learned about stage crew positions for the Short Play Festival

Tech Application:

Submit a handwritten or typed application with the following information:

-Your name

-Your #1 preferred position

-The reasoning to why you are best suited for this position.

-Your #2 preferred position

-The reasoning to why you are also suited for this position.

Give a brief and honest description of your work ethic? How will that help you succeed with your preferred tech position?

STAGE CREW POSITIONS

Stage Manager: 1 student
The Stage Manager works in tandem with the Director in rehearsal, recording the blocking and
seeing that cast members stay on script, have necessary props, and follow the staging. As the
lighting, sound and set change cues are developed, the stage manager meticulously records the
timing of each as it relates to the script and other aspects of the performance. All notes are
maintained in a prompt book which contains all cues, technical notes, blocking and other
information pertinent to the show. During the show the Stage Manager essentially takes control,
calling the cues for all transitions, as well as being responsible for communication between the
director, actors and back stage crew.

Assistant Stage Manager: 1-2 students
The Assistant Stage Manager is responsible for keeping track of cast members, sets and
miscellaneous details during rehearsals and production of a stage performance as directed by the
Stage Manager. They also attend each rehearsals and assist the Stage Manager in any assignments
given.

Costume Crew: 1-2 students
Assists the Costume Designer(s) with all aspects of costuming the show. This may involve cleaning and organizing in the costume storage area, assisting with moving costumes in and out of the storage area for each show, assisting with distribution of costume pieces and return of costume pieces from the actors, ensuring that all costume pieces are accounted for and in good working order at the end of each show, assisting actors with any required quick changes either on or near the stage and any other costume related needs of the show.

Make-up Head: 1 student
Assists with all aspects of make-up and hair for the show. Duties may include applying make-up, styling hair, assisting with keeping the make-up area and application tools clean and in good working order, assisting with any make-up and or hair/wig changes during the show
and any other make-up related needs of the show.

Lighting Designer / Lighting Board Operator: 1 student
After reading the play and meeting with the Director and Technical Director, designs a lighting plot for the show to provide all necessary lighting for the show including general area lighting and any lighting special effects. Once design is approved, works with Technical Director and lighting crew to hang and focus lights for show. Using computerized light board, designs looks for each scene and records cues into board for show. The Light Board Operator is responsible for operating the light board during all performances. Performs daily light checks at the beginning of all technical rehearsals and performance call times to ensure that all lighting equipment is working properly. May participate in hanging and focusing lights for show.

Sound Designer / Board Operator: 1 student
After reading the play and meeting with the Director and Technical Director, prepares all necessary sounds (music, sound effects, background etc.) for the show including any required pre-show, intermission or post show music mixes. Once approved prepares a CD of all sounds for sound crew and assists with setting levels and timing for cues. The student is also
responsible for operating the sound board during all performances. This includes all microphones, CD players, computers etc. required to provide sound for the show. Performs daily sound checks at the beginning of all technical rehearsals and performance call times to ensure that all sound equipment is operating properly.

Property Master: 1-2 students
Build, make or acquire any needed props for the production. During performances, the Prop Master is in charge of the prop table(s), making sure it is organized and all props are accounted for and in working order. Must check all props at the beginning of call-time and after every performance.

House Manager: 1 student
Is responsible for everything in front of the stage. Makes sure that the house is ready before any
audience members arrive. Organizes the ushers to pass out programs, collect tickets and make sure that the house always remains safe (i.e. aisles must remain a minimum of 4 feet wide and be clear at all times) and provides assistance to any audience members with wheelchairs. Generally
responsible for a pleasant audience experience before, during and after the show. For HSTC, they are also responsible for the publicity of the show. This includes press releases, posters, and social media advertising.

Stage Crew Leader and Crew: 2-4 students
Is responsible for the safety of the backstage area during all performances. Cleans stage at start of
call-time and is responsible for all set changes during the course of a performance or rehearsal.
Returns set to “pre-show” setting after every performance. They are also responsible for pulling and organizing set pieces for each director. The stage crew team is responsible for seamless transitions between performances.

11.20.18

Actors and Techs: Treasure Island in 2 minutes

11.19.18

Actors: Received Short play director groups

Techs: Got ready for Treasure Island strike after school

11.15.18

Actors and Techs: Helped get ready for Treasure Island 

11.14.18

Actors and Techs: Helped get ready for Treasure Island 

11.13.18

Actors and Techs: Helped get ready for Treasure Island 

11.9.18

Actors and Techs: Team bonding activities

11.8.18

Actors: Worked with Vocal Coach

Techs: Cleaned scene shop and remove You Can’t Beat the House set pieces from wings

11.6.18

Actors: Performed You Can’t Beat the House Groups 5-8

Techs: Set up the set for You Can’t Beat the House then watched performances

11.5.18

Actors: Performed You Can’t Beat the House Groups 1-4

Techs: Set up the set for You Can’t Beat the House then watched performances

11.2.18

Actors: Continued work on You Can’t Beat the House

Techs: Worked on posters and cleaned up the scene shop

11.1.18

Actors: Worked with Vocal Coach

Techs: Designed posters for the Student Play Festival

10.31.18

Actors and Techs: Worked on missing work for Mr. Buttner

10.30.18

Actors: Continued work on You Can’t Beat the House in preparation for some groups performing tomorrow

Techs: Continued work on digital set design

10.29.18

Actors: Worked on the You Can’t Beat the House and completed Short Play Submission Form

Techs: Set up the You Can’t Beat the House set and worked on set design

Set Design Example #1

Set Design Example #2

Set Design Example #3

Set Design Example #4

10.26.18

Actors: Continued work on You Can’t Beat The House
Friday: groups 1, 1.5, 4, and 5 on stage
Monday: groups 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 on stage
Tuesday: all groups on stage
Performance on Wednesday

Techs: Set the stage for You Can’t Beat The House, cleaned/organized the scene shop, and learned about set design.

10.25.18

Actors: Worked with Vocal Coach

Techs: Prepared the auditorium for Treasure Island and organized the scene shop

10.24.18

Actors: Worked on You Can’t Beat the House 

Techs: Dismantled stage blocks and prepared for Treasure Island rehearsals

Homework: Bring movement clothes for tomorrow, post monologue on your website by tomorrow, and post short plays on your website by Monday

10.23.18

Actors: Worked with Vocal Coach

Techs: Prepared for Treasure Island rehearsals

Homework: Off-book goal tomorrow, monologue posted on your website along with 3 short plays

**Script Resources:

https://www.playscripts.com/

https://www.hitplays.com/

http://www.lazybeescripts.co.uk/Scripts/

https://www.10-minute-plays.com/

https://www.samuelfrench.com/

10.22.18

Techs: Organized the rehearsal spaces in preparation for treasure island rehearsal after school

Actors: Went over monologue guidelines and how to pick a play for the Student Directed Play Festival

Monologue Guidelines:
2+ minutes long
Est. play.
Piece written for your gender.
Cont. Theatre (1950’s+)
No accents / no props

Selected monologue posted on website by Thursday, 10/25.

URL LINK

10.19.18

Actors: Continued work on You Can’t Beat the House

Techs: Continued work on website and notes on staging

Homework: Actors have an off-book quiz on Monday for You Can’t Beat the House

10.18.18

Actors: Worked with Vocal Coach

Techs: Worked on website and took notes on staging

10.17.18

ALL: Students created their website for Theatre Arts. This site is used to track their progress through the program.

TECHS: Theatre Spaces Notes: http://www.ia470.com/primer/theatres.htm

ACTORS: OB Goal: Monday, October 22. Each acting group continue rehearsing their scene for You Can’t Beat the House.

10.16.18

Actors: Continued working on You Can’t Beat the House scenes with performance groups.

Techs: Continued to do some housekeeping for Mr. Buttner and were put into groups for a competition to see who could set the scene for You Can’t Beat the House the fastest.

10.15.18

Actors: Got put into You Can’t Beat the House performance groups, read through script three times, determined characters, and discussed blocking and the set.

Techs: Worked on set dressing for You Can’t Beat the House and did some housekeeping for Mr. Buttner.

10.10.18

Actors: Read through Act 2 in You Can’t Beat the House and discussed characters and thoughts of the play.

Techs: Created the set based on the setting described in the play, learned how to spike the stage for set pieces, learned how to “dress” a set with props, and learned how to connect lamps to the lighting board.

Homework: TNR #3 due tomorrow

10.9.18

Actors & Techs: Read through Act 1 in You Can’t Beat the House and got into groups to discuss the characters and technical components of the play.

Homework: Read the rest of You Can’t Beat the House and complete script analysis due Monday, October 15th. Complete a TNR for Thursday, October 11th.

SCRIPT LINK

10.4.18

Self Reflection/Assessment

Using complete sentences, respond to each of the following questions:

1. How do you feel about your group’s performance? How clear was the storytelling?

2. Describe your preparation and how that affected your overall performance. Were you fully prepared? If not, how so?

3. What you feel you did well and what you wished had gone differently.

4. Explain what you learned about yourself as a performer & group member?

5. What you would do differently if you had the opportunity to perform again?

6. Regarding your character and plot, what did your character want from the other person in the scene? What was your tactic to achieve your goal?

7. How could you make that choice (your tactic in achieving your objective) clearer / larger / simpler / bolder?

8. What was your inner monologue while you listened to your partner speak?

9. What is the length of your performance video?

9.27.18

TECHS: Prezi on the McCandless Method

Notes: Jean Rosenthal – Lighting Theory

Notes: Types of Lighting Fixtures

Notes: What is the McCandless Method?

9.26.18

ACTORS: Notes on blocking:

Basic Functions of Blocking

Ideally, blocking should enhance the story on the stage by:

  • Reflecting the authentic behavior of the characters – a character’s movements can reveal just as much and sometimes more than his or her words do.
  • Reflecting the relationships between and among characters.
  • Giving the focus to certain characters at appropriate moments (helping the audience know where to look).
  • Allowing the audience to see what they are supposed to see and not what is meant to be hidden – either as part of the play or an accidental peek backstage.
  • Creating effective stage pictures – strong, pleasing, horrific – that convey the meanings and moods of the play.
  • Making effective use of the set.

9.25.18

Actors: Directing Challenge #3 (Quick transitional project)

Techs are working on the following project:

Unit: Lighting. Each group will present their demonstration to the actors on Wednesday (second half of class). Each tech in each group must present to the class.

In their groups, they will demonstrate the “Four Controllable Qualities of Light”.

  • Intensity–The intensity of a light source can vary from near total darkness to painfully bright.
    • (0-100 on the lighting board)
  • Color & Texture–Nearly any color you can think of can be created through the use of lighting gels or electronic means. Color can be a major player in creating a mood. However, the lighting designer must be careful in choosing colors so that they coordinate with the colors chosen for costumes and set pieces as well.
    • Techs will select a gel for color and a gobo for texture.
  • Direction–This is the area from which the light approaches the stage. This is a major contributor to the function of modeling. Light can come from below, directly above or anywhere in between. They can also originate from in front of the actors, behind them or off to a side. Each combination of directions has its unique effect on the highlights and shadows produced.
    • How is the fixture angled? Is it shuttered? Does it have a hard or soft focus?
  • Movement–refers to the changing in the lights whether it be a change in intensity, color or direction of origin.
    • Using the board, control how multiple fixtures turn on and off (and at what intensity?)

9.24.18

Lighting Quiz

ACTORS: Using complete sentences, respond to each of the following questions:

1. How do you feel about your group’s performance? How clear was the storytelling?

2. Describe your preparation and how that affected your overall performance.

3. What you feel you did well and what you wished had gone differently.

4. Explain what you learned about yourself as a performer & group member?

5. What you would do differently if you had the opportunity to perform again?

6. What is the length of your performance video?

DIRECTORSUsing complete sentences, respond to each of the following questions:

1. How do you feel about your group’s performance? How clear was the storytelling?

2. Describe your preparation and how that affected their performance.

3. What you feel you did well and what you wished had gone differently.

4. Explain what you learned about yourself as a director & group leader?

5. What you would do differently if you had the opportunity to direct again?

6. What is the length of your performance video?

9.11.18

Actors/Directors:

Self & Peer Reflection / Assessment

Using complete sentences, respond to each of the following questions:

1. Your overall feel of your performance.

2. Your preparation and how that affected your overall performance.

3. What you feel you did well and what you wished had gone differently.

4. What you learned about yourself as a performer.

5. What you would do different if you had the opportunity to perform again.

6. What is the length of your performance video?

Techs:

Lighting for the stage involves manipulating the four major Controllable Qualities of light; Intensity, Color, Direction and Movement; to influence the four functions of stage lighting which are Mood, Selective Focus, Modeling and Visibility.

Four Controllable Qualities of Light

  • Intensity–The intensity of a light source can vary from near total darkness to painfully bright.
  • Color–Nearly any color you can think of can be created through the use of lighting gels or electronic means. Color can be a major player in creating a mood. However, the lighting designer must be careful in choosing colors so that they coordinate with the colors chosen for costumes and set pieces as well.
  • Direction–This is the area from which the light approaches the stage. This is a major contributor to the function of modeling. Light can come from below, directly above or anywhere in between. They can also originate from in front of the actors, behind them or off to a side. Each combination of directions has its unique effect on the highlights and shadows produced.
  • Movement–refers to the changing in the lights whether it be a change in intensity, color or direction of origin.

Functions of Stage Lighting

  • Visibility is the primary function of stage lighting: making sure the audience can see the part(s) of the stage that the director and/or the lighting designer want them to see.
  • The modeling function includes creating a realistic (or intentionally non-realistic) view of the world of the play. This is done by strategically placing lights above, below, to the side, in front and behind the actors. Through the use of the placement of the lights, you can create different types of highlights and shadows on the actors, props and set pieces.
  • Selective Focus is the function of “forcing” the audience to look where it is desired for them to look through the use of high/low intensity and changes in intensity.
  • The function of Mood is both one of the most difficult and at the same time the easiest function to maintain. It is the easiest because it can be done very simply through the use of colors. However, it can also be overdone to the point of becoming cliche instead of allowing the actors and other aspects to contribute to the overall mood of the play.

8.30.18

Students continue their rehearsal for the ‘found space’ project. Some groups have volunteered to perform their short scene today. Students (actors and techs) are required to wear their ‘blacks’ for the final performance.

Since the class is displaced to the commons area for the week, I has delayed reviewing the HSTC handbook, syllabus, and its corresponding forms until next week.

Homework: Memorize the material and bring ‘blacks’ to school, unless the student is bringing an official costume instead.

8.27.18 (Day 1)

Mr. Buttner welcomed students to the new school year. The class reviewed ‘Day 1’ materials and ‘semester at a glance’. Following the paperwork, the students were led by Mr. Buttner in a series of theatre activities (play to learn) that set a good example for a typical class day.

Homework: ‘Semester at a Glance’ signed and returned on 8.28.18.

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