INTERMEDIATE THEATRE / BEG. TECHNICAL THEATRE

Brief Course Description: Acting students will broaden and deepen acting skills, including styles, directing, Theatre history, and Children’s Theatre. Students will have the opportunity to audition for the advanced ensemble.

Technical theatre students will learn the fundamentals of play production including set design and construction, lighting, sound, and costuming. Students will have the opportunity to progress to Technical Theatre II and III.

Interested in ‘leadership’ within HSTC? Click here to learn more!


COURSE DOCUMENTS

HSHS Wifi Instructions

Self/Peer Collaboration Rubric

Class Leadership Application

Character Analysis Worksheet

Essay Rubric (Honors)

Script Analysis Template

“Why Arts” Video

HSHS Scene Shop Rules & Expectations

NC Theatre Arts Essential Standards rev. 9.5.18

‘Performance Reflection’ Rubric
Unsatisfactory Range: 60-60%
Proficient Range: 71-84%
Advanced Range: 85-100%


REQUIRED FORMS

STEP 1: Review the Class Handbook & Syllabus

STEP 2 Due Friday, 1/25: Complete the Handbook Review Form

STEP 3: Print, have your parent/guardian sign, and turn in the following forms (ALL Due Friday, 1/25):

WCPSS Photo & Video Release Form

2018-19 Boosters Membership Form

STEP 4: Join the class’s GroupMe – see the link below


CONTACT INFORMATION & COMMUNICATION

Instructor / Director: Mr. Rome Buttner
B.A. in English, B.A. in Theatre Arts

Email: mbuttner@wcpss.net

GroupMe: https://groupme.com/join_group/47421330/NlVdq1

Twitter: @hshstheatre


DAILY CLASS BLOG:

4.9.19

Monologue Reflection Questions:

  1. What is something that you learned through preparing and performing your monologue? Explain.
  2. How you YOU feel about your performance? Explain. How well did you carry out the basics of acting?
  3. How have you improved since your first beginning theatre monologue project? How do you go you go about the monologue preparation process now?
  4. What needs to be improved in the overall performance?
  5. What is something that you liked about your performance?
  6. What is something that you found difficult during the monologue process?
  7. Performance length?

3.21.19

Tech Positions:

STAGE CREW POSITIONS

Stage Manager: 1 student
The Stage Manager works in tandem with the Director in rehearsal, recording the blocking and seeing that cast members stay on script, have necessary props, and follow the staging. As the lighting, sound and set change cues are developed, the stage manager meticulously records the
timing of each as it relates to the script and other aspects of the performance. All notes are maintained in a prompt book which contains all cues, technical notes, blocking and other information pertinent to the show. During the show the Stage Manager essentially takes control,
calling the cues for all transitions, as well as being responsible for communication between the director, actors and back stage crew.

Assistant Stage Manager: 1-2 students
The Assistant Stage Manager is responsible for keeping track of cast members, sets and miscellaneous details during rehearsals and production of a stage performance as directed by the Stage Manager. They also attend each rehearsals and assist the Stage Manager in any assignments given.

Costume Crew: 1-2 students
Assists the Costume Designer(s) with all aspects of costuming the show. This may involve cleaning and organizing in the costume storage area, assisting with moving costumes in and out of the storage area for each show, assisting with distribution of costume pieces and return of costume pieces from the actors, ensuring that all costume pieces are accounted for and in good working order at the end of each show, assisting actors with any required quick changes either on or near the stage and any other costume related needs of the show.

Make-up Head: 1 student
Assists with all aspects of make-up and hair for the show. Duties may include applying make-up, styling hair, assisting with keeping the make-up area and application tools clean and in good working order, assisting with any make-up and or hair/wig changes during the show and any other make-up related needs of the show.

Lighting Designer / Lighting Board Operator: 1 student
After reading the play and meeting with the Director and Technical Director, designs a lighting plot for the show to provide all necessary lighting for the show including general area lighting and any lighting special effects. Once design is approved, works with Technical Director and lighting crew to hang and focus lights for show. Using computerized light board, designs looks for each scene and records cues into board for show. The Light Board Operator is responsible for operating the light board during all performances. Performs daily light checks at the beginning of all technical rehearsals and performance call times to ensure that all lighting equipment is working properly. May participate in hanging and focusing lights for show.

Sound Designer / Board Operator: 1 student
After reading the play and meeting with the Director and Technical Director, prepares all necessary sounds (music, sound effects, background etc.) for the show including any required pre-show, intermission or post show music mixes. Once approved prepares a CD of all sounds for sound crew and assists with setting levels and timing for cues. The student is also
responsible for operating the sound board during all performances. This includes all microphones, CD players, computers etc. required to provide sound for the show. Performs daily sound checks at the beginning of all technical rehearsals and performance call times to ensure that all sound equipment is operating properly.

Property Master: 1-2 students
Build, make or acquire any needed props for the production. During performances, the Prop Master is in charge of the prop table(s), making sure it is organized and all props are accounted for and in working order. Must check all props at the beginning of call-time and after every performance.

House Manager: 1 student
Is responsible for everything in front of the stage. Makes sure that the house is ready before any audience members arrive. Organizes the ushers to pass out programs, collect tickets and make sure that the house always remains safe (i.e. aisles must remain a minimum of 4 feet wide and be clear at all times) and provides assistance to any audience members with wheelchairs. Generally responsible for a pleasant audience experience before, during and after the show. For HSTC, they are also responsible for the publicity of the show. This includes press releases, posters, and social media advertising.

Stage Crew Leader and Crew: 2-4 students
Is responsible for the safety of the backstage area during all performances. Cleans stage at start of call-time and is responsible for all set changes during the course of a performance or rehearsal.
Returns set to “pre-show” setting after every performance. They are also responsible for pulling and organizing set pieces for each director. The stage crew team is responsible for seamless transitions between performances.

3.20.19

Technical Theatre – Marketing

Information:

Title: Director’s Choice

Subtitle: An Evening of Scenes from Pulitzer Prize Recognized Plays

Presenter: The HSTC Intermediate Ensemble

Date: May 14, 2019

Time: 7:00 PM

Tickets: $5.00

Location: Holly Springs High School

‘More Information Found online at www.HSHSTheatreCompany.org

3.19.19

INT Play/Scene Submission Form

3.18.19

Directing Questions

3.15.19

Short Play Lighting Project

Actor Reflection Questions:

  1. What is something that you learned through the acting project? Explain.
  2. How you YOU feel about your performance? Explain. How well did you carry out the basics of acting?
  3. What is the ONE thing that you have improved upon this semester?
  4. What is something that you are really good at? Explain why.
  5. What is some that you need to improve? How do you plan on improving it?
  6. What needs to be improved in the overall performance?
  7. What is something that you liked about the activity?
  8. What is something that you found difficult during this activity?
  9. Performance length?

Tech Reflection Questions:

  1. What is something that you learned through the lighting project? Explain.
  2. How you YOU feel about your execution of the lighting project? Explain.
  3. What is the ONE thing that you have improved upon this semester?
  4. What is something that you are really good at? Explain why.
  5. What is some that you need to improve? How do you plan on improving it?
  6. What would you attempt if you were given a second chance with the project?
  7. What is something that you liked about the project?
  8. What is something that you found difficult during this project?
  9. Performance length?

3.5.19

LEKO & FIXTURE Quiz

Script Materials:

Woodchucks / Clubhouse / The End

Digital Portfolio Resources:

Example Storymatic Artifact

NC DPI Theatre Standards

URL Submission Form (all must re-submit)

2.19.19

TECHS: Prezi on the McCandless Method

Notes: Jean Rosenthal – Lighting Theory

Notes: Types of Lighting Fixtures

Notes: What is the McCandless Lighting Method?

McCandless Lighting Method Diagram

Lighting for the stage involves manipulating the four major Controllable Qualities of light; Intensity, Color, Direction and Movement; to influence the four functions of stage lighting which are Mood, Selective Focus, Modeling and Visibility.

Four Controllable Qualities of Light

  • Intensity–The intensity of a light source can vary from near total darkness to painfully bright.
  • Color–Nearly any color you can think of can be created through the use of lighting gels or electronic means. Color can be a major player in creating a mood. However, the lighting designer must be careful in choosing colors so that they coordinate with the colors chosen for costumes and set pieces as well.
  • Direction–This is the area from which the light approaches the stage. This is a major contributor to the function of modeling. Light can come from below, directly above or anywhere in between. They can also originate from in front of the actors, behind them or off to a side. Each combination of directions has its unique effect on the highlights and shadows produced.
  • Movement–refers to the changing in the lights whether it be a change in intensity, color or direction of origin.

Functions of Stage Lighting

  • Visibility is the primary function of stage lighting: making sure the audience can see the part(s) of the stage that the director and/or the lighting designer want them to see.
  • The modeling function includes creating a realistic (or intentionally non-realistic) view of the world of the play. This is done by strategically placing lights above, below, to the side, in front and behind the actors. Through the use of the placement of the lights, you can create different types of highlights and shadows on the actors, props and set pieces.
  • Selective Focus is the function of “forcing” the audience to look where it is desired for them to look through the use of high/low intensity and changes in intensity.
  • The function of Mood is both one of the most difficult and at the same time the easiest function to maintain. It is the easiest because it can be done very simply through the use of colors. However, it can also be overdone to the point of becoming cliche instead of allowing the actors and other aspects to contribute to the overall mood of the play.

Unit: Lighting. Each group will present their demonstration to the actors on Wednesday (second half of class). Each tech in each group must present to the class.

In their groups, they will demonstrate the “Four Controllable Qualities of Light”.

  • Intensity–The intensity of a light source can vary from near total darkness to painfully bright.
    • (0-100 on the lighting board)
  • Color & Texture–Nearly any color you can think of can be created through the use of lighting gels or electronic means. Color can be a major player in creating a mood. However, the lighting designer must be careful in choosing colors so that they coordinate with the colors chosen for costumes and set pieces as well.
    • Techs will select a gel for color and a gobo for texture.
  • Direction–This is the area from which the light approaches the stage. This is a major contributor to the function of modeling. Light can come from below, directly above or anywhere in between. They can also originate from in front of the actors, behind them or off to a side. Each combination of directions has its unique effect on the highlights and shadows produced.
    • How is the fixture angled? Is it shuttered? Does it have a hard or soft focus?
  • Movement–refers to the changing in the lights whether it be a change in intensity, color or direction of origin.
    • Using the board, control how multiple fixtures turn on and off (and at what intensity?)
 

2.12.19

Directing Project #3 Script

Reflection Questions:

Using complete sentences, respond to each of the following questions:

1. How do you feel about your group’s performance? How clear was the storytelling?

2. Describe your preparation and how that affected the overall performance.

3. What you feel you did well and what you wished had gone differently.

4. Explain what you learned about yourself as a performer/director & group member?

5. What you would do differently if you had the opportunity to produce it again?

6. What is the length of your performance video?

2.6.19

ACTORS / TECHS: Explored what it’s like to be a technician for a large scale production: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6ytaZ9fk64

ACTORS: Continued working on “Gruesome Playground Injuries”

TECHS: Explored the different jobs in technical theatre. They then learned about various theatre adhesives that are used as part of the stage crew.

Homework: None

2.4.19

ACTORS: Started the ‘directing project #2″ with Gruesome Playground Injuries.

Directing Tip #3:

“On Being lazy”
No actor likes a lazy director, or an ignorant one. You should certainly know the meaning (and the pronunciation) of every word, every reference, every foreign phrase. Also, be decisive. As the director, you have three weapons:
“Yes,” “No,” and “I don’t know.” Use them. Don’t dither; you can always change your mind later. Nobody minds that. What they do mind is the two-minute agonizing when all the actor has asked is, “Do I get up now?”

TECHS: they learned how to set up and deconstruct the scaffolding.

HOMEWORK: NONE

1.24.19

Stage Body Positions

Marvel Characters Body Positions

Parts of the Stage

Director’s Tip 1:

Identify the story’s compelling question.

Every good play has a basic “will they or won’t they…” an essential question about the central character(s). As a director, you must understand what primarily keeps the audience interested in the ongoing action.

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